Emmy winner Bryan Cranston stars in Your Honor.

Photo credit: Andreas Laszlo Konrath/Trunk Archive

By Nate Millado

If ever there was a time we needed television, it was the last year and a half—and CBS Studios gave us stories that made us laugh, cry, and everything in between. With Primetime Emmy nominations just weeks away (July 13), we want to show some love to a few shows and artists that delivered award-worthy entertainment—and escapism.

READ MORE: Flip Through the Gorgeous Watch For Your Consideration Issue Now!

Star Trek: Discovery for Outstanding Drama Series

Sonequa Martin Green in black dress leaning against disco ball

Sonequa Martin-Green leads an "extraordinary" cast.

Photo credit: Marie H Rainville/CBS Watch

"So many times we're in the editing room with this treasure trove of options because our cast is so extraordinary. —Alex Kurtzman, executive producer of Star Trek: Discovery

Watch all episodes of Star Trek: Discovery streaming on Paramount+.

The Neighborhood for Outstanding Comedy Series

\u200bCedric the Entertainer and Max Greenfield

Cedric the Entertainer and Max Greenfield star in The Neighborhood.

Photo credit: Eric Ray Davidson/CBS Watch

"The Neighborhood bridges gaps. It allows us to reach people we would never ever reach before." —Tichina Arnold, who costars as Tina on The Neighborhood

The Neighborhood returns on Monday, Sept. 20, at 8 p.m. ET/PT on CBS and streams on Paramount+.

The Late Show With Stephen Colbert for Outstanding Variety Talk Series

Stephen Colbert and Barack Obama

Stephen Colbert beats President Barack Obama at waste basketball.

Photo credit: Best Possible Screen Grab/CBS

"There's only one thing better than a joke working…a joke not working," said The Late Show host Stephen Colbert. As for his favorite guest moment? Beating Barack Obama at waste basketball. "I think both of us will carry that in our hearts in very different ways."

The Late Show With Stephen Colbert airs weeknights at 11:35/10:35c on CBS and Paramount+.

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The Bite for Outstanding Drama Series

\u200bAudra McDonald

Audra McDonald stars in The Bite and The Good Fight.

Photo: Michele Crowe/CBS.

"Robert and Michelle [King]'s team wanted to find a way to give it some energy. So they insert zombies…you got your energy." —Audra McDonald discussing The Bite on The Talk

The Bite airs exclusively on Spectrum.

The Bite for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series

Robert and Michelle King in the writers room

Husband-and-wife team Robert and Michelle King (The Good Fight) wrote, produced, and set their zombie drama The Bite during the pandemic.

Photo: Jeff Neumann/CBS Watch

The Bite, Scene 22
Rachel clicks over to her mom, DR. HESTER BOUTELLA (65). She pops onto Rachel's screen. Nobel Prize–winning immunologist. Imperious. Loves scarves. (A little of Dr. Birx in her.) Thinks her daughter should be doing more important work.

The Bite airs exclusively on Spectrum.

Your Honor for Outstanding Limited Series

Bryan Cranston

Emmy winner Bryan Cranston stars in Your Honor.

Photo credit: Andreas Laszlo Konrath/Trunk Archive

"I don't want to do any show or play where the audience can fall asleep. I want them to feel obligated to stay with it at every moment and feel that anxiety level." —Bryan Cranston

Stream Your Honor on SHOWTIME.

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The Amazing Race and Tough As Nails for Outstanding Reality Competition

Phil Keoghan

Host with the most: Phil Keoghan runs The Amazing Race and Tough As Nails.

Photo: Cliff Lipson/CBS Watch

"There's lots of shows out there that honor people that are really good at singing and dancing and are good looking, but I felt that there was a place for acknowledging those people who keep a country running. Real people in real life who are real tough." —Phil Keoghan on Tough As Nails to Deadline

Stream episodes of The Amazing Race and Tough As Nails on Paramount+.

The Comey Rule for Outstanding Limited Series

Jeff Daniels and Brendan Gleeson

Comey (Jeff Daniels) and Trump (Brendan Gleeson) face off.

Photo credit: Ben Mark Holzberg/CBS Television Studios/SHOWTIME

"Jim Comey was trying to do the right thing in a world that didn't care what the right thing was." — Jeff Daniels

"What I loved about it was the authenticity of actually knowing that these were words that were spoken." —Brendan Gleeson

Stream The Comey Rule on SHOWTIME.

The Equalizer for Outstanding Drama Series

Queen Latifah in a black leather jacket

All hail the Queen: Latifah stars in The Equalizer.

Photo credit: Sophy Holland/CBS.

"I've seen a lot of real-life equalizers in my life so why not bring one to the screen who looks like me?" —Queen Latifah

Watch The Equalizer on CBS and streaming on Paramount+.

READ MORE: Flip Through the Gorgeous Watch For Your Consideration Issue Now!

The Late Late Show With James Corden for Outstanding Variety Talk Series

James Corden

James Corden hosts The Late Late Show.

Photo credit:Terence Patrick/CBS

"We want to be a place that gives people light relief in what's been an unimaginably difficult year." —James Corden

The Late Late Show With James Corden airs weeknights at 12:37/11:37c on CBS and Paramount+.

The Stand for Outstanding Limited Series

\u200bAlexander Skarsgard

Alexander Skarsgård as Randall Flagg in The Stand

Photo credit: Robert Falconer/CBS

"I wanted to write about bravery. At some point, people do have to make a stand." —Stephen King to Vanity Fair

Stream The Stand on Paramount+.

Star Trek: Lower Decks for Outstanding Animation

Star Trek Lower Decks cast

Jack Quaid as Ensign Brad Boimler, Tawny Newsome as Ensign Beckett Mariner, Eugene Cordero as Ensign Rutherford, and Noël Wells as Ensign Tendi

Photo credit: Best Possible Screen Grab/CBS

"I wanted to do something that when I looked back on it for the rest of my life, I would be really proud of what I did at that one moment. And what I'm really proud of accomplishing with that season is it's the balance of it's really good Star Trek, and it's a comedy that I really like." —Creator and showrunner Mike McMahan to IGN

Stream Star Trek: Lower Decks on Paramount+.

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Dress by Gucci. Sandals by Steve Madden. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.


By Lisa Kennedy

When Tichina Arnold hopped on the video call, she was in a parking structure in Century City messing with a boot. No, not a DMV boot, but an orthopedic one. Social media followers of Arnold (and you are legion) know that the star—who gives such verve to Tina Butler on the hit sitcom The Neighborhood —has been recovering from foot surgery. (Her path to healing gets a nod at the start of Season 3.) "Hold on one second, one second—I'm getting the boot," she shouts to someone honking for no good reason. She waves said boot. "I never thought I'd be so excited about a goddamn boot," says Arnold, adding with a laugh, "I'm trying to get my sexy back, or at least half of my sexy back."

Arnold, 51, has spent more than 30 years working in television and film. The Queens, New York native started acting at 11 and hasn't had many lulls since. She did soaps (Ryan's Hope), sang and danced (Little Shop of Horrors), and played pivotal roles in two popular comedies that were part of the surge in Black television programming: first as Pam, Tisha Campbell's bestie on Martin, and a few years later as mom Rochelle on Chris Rock's critically appreciated Everybody Hates Chris.

Now she's bringing no small amount of smarts and sparkle opposite another comedy luminary. Cedric the Entertainer (an executive producer on The Neighborhood) portrays Calvin Butler, who's vexed—and over time kind of charmed—when small-towners Dave and Gemma Johnson (Max Greenfield and Beth Behrs) and their young son settle next door in a predominantly Black neighborhood.

The Neighborhood airs on Mondays at 8/7c on CBS and streams Paramount+.


Tichina Arnold on the cover WATCH Magazine

Top by Balenciaga. Pants by Halston. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

How long have you been in L.A. now?

I've been here since 1991. I moved here right before I did Martin and ended up staying.

To say the least. You've been doing television for nearly 30 years. What's changed for you and what's changed in television?

A lot has changed in the industry, period. Television definitely became more open, more racy, a little more real. If we did Martin now and we were able to say what we wanted to say, it would be a completely different show. Back then we had a censor, this guy named … what was his name? He used to come and count the "damns," count the "hells."

Tichina Arnold in a vibrant vintage dress

Gown, vintage. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

What drew you to The Neighborhood?

What attracted me initially were two things: being able to work with Cedric and, I've been on great shows, but this was a wonderful opportunity to finally be on a major network. CBS didn't have a whole lot of Black folk, so I was happy that CBS was being a lot more open to having more color on the network. That, to me, showed television was definitely changing. It's not just a Black show. You have a lot of inclusivity. So I was like, "Yeah, I want to be part of this."

It's crazy you haven't worked with Cedric before.

It's bananas. We have all the same friends.

The Neighborhood has such sweet cast chemistry. Is it as good as it seems?

Everybody is just really good. Everybody's like their characters. Creator Jim Reynolds had Tina all mapped out. But when I came and read for the role, he saw other things. So I'm appreciative of that, because Black women, we're not just one thing. We have so many facets to us. Every time I open the script, there's always something new about Tina that I learn, which is fun. Jim will ask me, "Tichina, do Black women do this?" And I'll tell him abso-frigging-lutely-not. You see her flaws, and Cedric makes sure of it.

Tichina Arnold in a courtyard wearing a vibrant dress

Robe by Camilla and Marc. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

Where do you overlap with Tina?

You know, most women, we want to keep our youth as much as we can. I knew then, when I played on Everybody Hates Chris, that once you play a mother, you will always be a mother. Goddammit. [Laughs.] OK, this is the first time I'm a mother of grown sons—one got a beard. Omigod. I just have to accept that. But it's television, and I can be whatever I want to be. I'm 51 and a lot of my friends had kids by the time they were 17. So you have a lot of Black mothers who look like they are 25 or 30, but they're 50. Snoop made a post that was hysterical. He posted this little girl, and it said something like, "Yeah, I'm really 42." Like "Black don't crack."

Did Cedric help you figure it out?

He's very hands-on. So he said, "Look I want you to be comfortable, but we're parents … You still smoking." Cedric's really good at being this amazing Black man on camera as well as off. Cedric's always been such a wonderful human being, and the show has that temperature. The show has that texture to it because he is a good leader. He is a good leading man. He's smart. He's respectful. He has a lot of empathy for people. He knows how to communicate. He never raises his voice. This show could not have come at a better time.

Tichina Arnold sitting in a window sill

Robe by Camilla and Marc. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

Could you expand on that? I can think of all kinds of reasons, but as my dad said, "You know what 'assume' spells?"

Well, a lot of negativity has been stirred up—and this negativity is nothing new. This is what we as Black people have been dealing with, and I always speak from the Black perspective because that's what I am. And I think this show created a wonderful platform to start dialogue. This show displays our differences. It happens at the table reads all the time: We'll be sitting at the table, and a Black joke will happen, and Beth and Max will go, "What?!" because everybody Black in the room laughs. But it happened with me, too. In the script someone says, "Hey, I'm going out for a froyo." I was like, "Sorry guys, what's a froyo?" The point is, whether we're White, Black, we have different ways of communicating with each other. So what I love about being on the show is that we continue communication.

The first episode of the third season addressed Black Lives Matter. Some people who love the show have said they'll stop watching. What is that?

Guess what, sometimes when the truth is told, it's uncomfortable. This is part of change. It's a natural human instinct; you don't want to be uncomfortable. But it's what we do with our being uncomfortable. I'm happy that we have a platform. We deal with real topics. This is not fantasy. I think it's wonderful we've tapped into Black Lives Matter. Just add "too" behind it. We matter, too. For me to be on a show that's on CBS, and CBS is able to say Black lives matter, that's change. And it's change for the better.

I'm grateful that I can be a part of a body of work that understands me as a Black woman in America and that actually displays me as a Black woman in America. We have a long way to go in understanding each other, and The Neighborhood really addresses that. And we do it off-camera as well. So Beth and I always talk about that. She's like, "What can I do as a White woman?" And I said the fact that you asked allows me to share my story with you. Now, I need to hear your story. What makes you uncomfortable? What do you want to learn? What do you want to know? Trust me, I ask questions. You learn till the day you die. That's what matters to me.

Tichina Arnold posing on stairs

Dress by Gucci. Sandals by Steve Madden. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

So, where did you get that perspective? Life? Family? You grew up in the church, and that seems to feed your understanding of the world, and you still have a compassionate way of expressing that.

That's a nice way of putting it.

No, really. You and [your sister] Zenay were on Beth's Harmonics with Beth Behrs podcast, and she said she considered herself a "lapsed Catholic." One of you said about church that we go to meet God by ourselves. Such a great insight.

I get it from my parents. Both of my parents are givers. My mother will give the shirt off her back and so will my dad. They've just always been that way, and we came up really staunch Christians. Me being in show business, I was kind of the heathen. [Laughs.]

Did you know at 11 that you were going to want to keep doing this?

I didn't know anything else. I did shows for free. I did it because I loved it. Not until I got to L.A. and I had to start paying rent did that change. I was like, "Omigod, I got to depend upon this?!" Prior to that, I was just doing what I love doing.

Tichina Arnold on a bed wearing a sparkly dress

Dress by Zadig & Voltaire. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

How do you protect that relationship to what you love?

Well, I've been at a point where I didn't have two nickels to rub together, and still I turned down work because I did not believe in what that piece of work was. I didn't want to wake up every day doing that.

Do you have any episodes of The Neighborhood that you loved or that you thought, I nailed that?

Now you're asking me to tap into my menopause problem—let me think. I have moments. I laugh at moments, not episodes. But I don't think I've ever said Oh, I nailed anything. I'm not interested in watching myself. The one time somebody made me watch Hope & Redemption: The Lena Baker Story [2008], we watched it in my agent's office. And I forgot that I was watching myself.

Now that was weird. It freaked me out. I said, "Wow, God gave you exactly what you wanted." I did a film with absolutely no comedy in the character whatsoever. I kept saying, I just want to do a dramatic role. I want to see if I can do it. So here I played a real woman who walked this earth, to be the first woman executed in the state of Georgia. Just reading and watching and hearing about her life. I was like, how can I do this woman justice? So after I watched the movie, I felt grateful that I was able to fool myself. Because I forgot that I was watching myself. I felt like I did it; I reached a goal.

Tichina Arnold in a white pants suit

Top by Balenciaga. Pants by Halston. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

So do you have some rules for yourself about how you engage on social media?

I do. I don't reply to people. You reply to one, you have to reply to all. I make it a point that if I am joking about something, I'm not being insensitive. It's like sending text messages: A lot of stuff could be misread. That's what happens with Twitter all the time. What I do is, I never have a cocktail and tweet. And if I know that it's really, really socially edgy, I'll ask my sister, "Should I?"

Speaking of Zenay, who's also your manager, what were you two like as little kids?

We were opposites but the same. She was a lefty. I'm a righty. But she insists on sitting on the side where our arms knock. Constant fights. I tortured her. She used to think she would go down the drain. We would take baths together, so I'd push her toward it. My parents taught us that all we have is each other. So even to this day, we are very good with separating our business relationship from our sisterhood.

Tichina Arnold in a white top

Top by Balenciaga. Pants by Halston. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

So how do you get 2 million–plus Instagram followers?

That came from me trying not to lose my mind. Because I used to fight with my daughter [Alijah, age 16] every morning. By the time she was 3, we were in the car all the time and she didn't want to be in the seat. Here I am a single mom and I'd start singing. She loves dancing and I wanted her to sing. We started singing in the car. I posted: "For all you parents out there that had a hard time getting your kid up this morning, this is for you. You're not alone."

I had grandmothers hitting me, aunts hitting me, single dads hitting me. We all really do go through the same things, right?Different times, different places, different levels, different households. I never ever mind sharing my pain as long as I've learned from that pain. So now I can tell you what that pain feels like, but I can also tell you what I learned.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Kwaku Alston

STYLED BY: Dana Campbell

HAIR: Robbi Rogers

MAKEUP: @bethcarterbeauty using MAC

Originally published in Watch Magazine, November-December 2020.

The Neighborhood airs on Mondays at 8/7c on CBS and streams Paramount+.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

As Tichina Arnold dives into Season 3 of playing Tina Butler—the vivacious wife of Calvin (Cedric the Entertainer), and mom to their two adult sons—she couldn't be prouder of the work she's done on the platform for change that The Neighborhood has become.

So who would have guessed that on top of it all, she could rock a fashion shoot like nobody's business? We had a hunch, and the proof is here, photographed by Kwaku Alston and styled by Dana Campbell for the November-December 2020 issue of Watch.

Scroll to see all the pretty portraits, and don't miss Tichina Arnold's full interview in latest issue of Watch—available now!

SEE MORE: Check Out The Latest Issue Of Watch Magazine—Available Now!

Watch all-new episodes of The Neighborhood on Mondays at 8/7c on CBS and CBS All Access.

Playing It Cool

Tichina Arnold in a vibrant vintage dress

Gown, vintage. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

"Once you play a mother you will always be a mother," Tichina tells Watch, referencing her former role on Everybody Hates Chris, but noting this is her first time playing a mother of grown-up sons. Happily, though, "It's television," she says. "And I can be whoever I want to be."

Textural Tapestry

Tichina Arnold sitting on stairs

Dress by Gucci. Sandals by Steve Madden. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

Describing Cedric the Entertainer, aka The Neighborhood's Calvin Butler, as "a wonderful human being" who is both empathic and respectful, Tichina asserts that "the show has that texture to it because he is a good leader."

Platform Perfection

Black and white photo of Tichina Arnold standing on stairs

Dress by Gucci. Sandals by Steve Madden. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

"What I love about being on the show is that we continue communication." — Tichina Arnold

Character Driven

Tichina Arnold in a vibrant vintage dress

Gown, vintage. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

"Everybody's like their characters [in real life]," Tichina Arnold tells Watch in her November-December 2020 cover story, a nod to The Neighborhood's creator Jim Reynolds' vision. But she also appreciates Reynolds' openness to her own take on Tina's MO. "Jim will ask me, 'Tichina, do Black women do this?' And I'll tell him 'abso-friggin-lutely not.' You see her flaws and Cedric makes sure of it."

Bold Choices

Tichina Arnold in a courtyard wearing a vibrant dress

Robe by Camilla and Marc. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

"It's a natural human instinct," Arnold says of the moment earlier this season when some fans were unhappy with the showrunners' choice to address Black Lives Matter. "You don't want to be uncomfortable," she observes. "But it's what we do with our being uncomfortable. I'm happy that we have a platform."

Attitude Of Gratitude

Tichina Arnold on a bed wearing a sparkly dress

Dress by Zadig & Voltaire. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

"I'm grateful that I can be a part of a body of work that understands me as a Black woman in America and that actually displays me as a Black woman in America. We have a long way to go in understanding each other, and The Neighborhood really addresses that." — Tichina Arnold

Story Time

Tichina Arnold wearing a sparkly dress

Dress by Zadig & Voltaire. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

Tichina Arnold tells Watch that she and costar Beth Behrs often share their stories with each other off-camera, and the desire to understand each other's perspectives is more than mutual: "Trust me, I ask questions. You learn till the day you die. That's what matters to me."

Spiritual Being

Black and white photo of Tichina Arnold smiling

Gown, vintage. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

"We came up really staunch Christians," Arnold says of growing up with her now-manager sister Zenay. "Me being in show business," she laughs, "I was kind of the heathen."

As Good As Gold

Tichina Arnold posing on stairs

Dress by Gucci. Sandals by Steve Madden. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

"Cedric's always been such a wonderful human being, and the show has that temperature."— Tichina Arnold

The Natural

Tichina Arnold sitting in a window sill

Robe by Camilla and Marc. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

A natural actor who "did shows for free" in her early life, Arnold tells Watch that didn't change till she moved to L.A. "I was like, 'Omigod, I got to depend upon this?!'" Prior to that moment, she says, "I was just doing what I love doing."

Creative Integrity

Tichina Arnold in a white pants suit

Top by Balenciaga. Pants by Halston. Shoes by Stewart Weitzman. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

"I've been at a point where I didn't have two nickels to rub together, and still I turned down work because I did not believe in what that piece of work was. I didn't want to wake up every day doing that." — Tichina Arnold

Big Moments

Tichina Arnold in a white top

Top by Balenciaga. Pants by Halston. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

"I laugh at moments, not episodes," Arnold says when asked by our writer if she sees herself as having nailed a particular Neighborhood episode. "I don't think I've ever said, Oh, I nailed anything. I'm not interested in watching myself."

Rules Of Engagement

Tichina Arnold in a courtyard wearing a vibrant dress

Robe by Camilla and Marc. Shoes by Giuseppe Zanotti. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

When it comes to managing her substantial social media presence, Tichina Arnold admits she's careful about being misconstrued, and makes sure her followers know when she's joking. "I never have a cocktail and tweet. And if I know that it's really, really socially edgy, I'll ask my sister, 'Should I?'"

SEE MORE: Check Out The Latest Issue Of Watch Magazine—Available Now!

Watch all-new episodes of The Neighborhood on Mondays at 8/7c on CBS and CBS All Access.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.


In this new teaser, Tichina Arnold shows off her natural beauty and grace. Get a sneak peek at some of these pretty new portraits captured by Kwaku Alston, and don't miss the upcoming November-December 2020 issue of Watch featuring Tichina Arnold—on newsstands December 15!

Watch all-new episodes of The Neighborhood on Mondays at 8/7c on CBS and CBS All Access.

Step right up

Tichina Arnold poised on a staircase

Dress by Gucci. Sandals by Steve Madden. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

Talk about being fierce and absolutely fabulous!

Bright light

Tichina Arnold laughing

Dress by Zadig & Voltaire. Jewelry by Dana Campbell.

Photography by Kwaku Alston. Styled by Dana Campbell.

Like her delightful The Neighborhood character Tina Butler, Tichina Arnold finds joy in the moment.

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Watch all-new episodes of The Neighborhood on Mondays at 8/7c on CBS and CBS All Access.

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